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Stop Changes to Access to Work


On Tuesday 24th October, campaigners, service users and MPs gathered at Portcullis House to launch ‘Barriers to Work’ – a report authored by Catherine Hale and commissioned by Inclusion London, based on a survey carried out by the StopChanges2AtW campaign.

‘Barriers to Work’ looks at what happened with Access to Work and how can the scheme be once again fit for purpose.

The meeting was chaired by Debbie Abrahams MP, Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and Sean McGovern, co-Chair of the TUC Disabled Workers’ Committee. Ellen Clifford from the StopChanges2AtW campaign introduced the recommendations for improving Deaf and Disabled people’s experience of Access to Work.


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