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Work and Health Expert Research Collaborative

I am delighted to part of a 10 month network of research experts in the area of work and health. My role is ensuring that disabled people and those with health conditions are involved in the planning and prioritising of future research, alongside SpeakUp Rotherham and Breakthrough UK.  The project is led by Prof Adam Whitworth of the University of Strathclyde and funded by the National Institute of Health Research.

The Work and Health Development Award allows us to focus on identifying future research & policy priorities and innovative possibilities in the UK work-health landscape. Employers, policy stakeholders, disabled people & the general public are at its heart. And a stellar team of diverse expertise from University of Strathclyde, King's College London, The University of Sheffield and  University of East Anglia are coming together to address a key challenge: the 2.5 million people excluded from the UK labour market due to ill health.

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